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My Review of the Book, “Tap Dancing to Work”

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Investing is my life. It has been my life since a decade ago when I first picked up a copy of “Security Analysis”, the bible of investing. Over the past decade, I have spent thousands of hours analysing companies, books and also great investors. One investor that I have researched so much on (as have so many others) is Warren Buffett. His extreme frugality, his intelligence, his sensibility and his focus have been

Over the past decade, I have spent thousands of hours analysing companies, books and also great investors. One investor that I have researched so much on (as have so many others) is Warren Buffett. His extreme frugality, intelligence, sensibility and focus have been fascinating to me. However, I have long understood that the success of Warren Buffett cannot be easily duplicated.

His approach to life and investing can be quite extreme for a regular guy like me.

For example, he once refused to lend some money to his only daughter who wanted to renovate her kitchen. He told her to “go to the bank and do it like everyone else”. This was after he was already a billionaire.

How about the story of how he decided to publicly disown his adopted granddaughter for appearing in a film, “The One Percent”? Although I have watched the movie and disagree with what the movie is trying to imply, I don’t think I will ever disown my granddaughter for it. This is how extreme Buffett can get. However, his extreme ways of doing things make him interesting too.

The Review

“Tap Dancing To Work” is one of the few books that is endorsed by Buffett. It is a collection of articles written about Buffett, some penned by his good friend, journalist Carol Loomis, and some are by Warren Buffett himself.

The book has some interesting stories, like what happened to Buffett after the global financial crisis in 2008 and his time as chairman of Solomon. It also discusses how he came to investing in some of his companies.

However, because the book is structured as a series of articles and it is written by a close friend, the book might not provide much information about some of the more controversial topics about Buffett, as mentioned earlier.

Overall, it was still a good and insightful read. However, if you are really more interested in finding out about the story of Warren since the very beginning of this life, “The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life” by Alice Schroeder is a better one.

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The information provided is for general information purposes only and is not intended to be personalised investment or financial advice. Motley Fool Singapore contributor Stanley Lim doesn’t own shares in any companies mentioned.