The Week In Numbers: New Listings On The Horizon

The Singapore market could be about to say goodbye to another company and hello to two others. China Pacific Holdings (SGX: C22) has moved to delist from the Singapore Exchange. But Frasers REIT and Fullerton Health could be getting ready to list.

The former could be valued as much as $900 million, while the latter could be worth S$1.5 billion. It could be exciting times for the Singapore bourse, following recent news that Manulife might also list its US office real estate investment trusts in Singapore.

The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) has received the thumbs-up from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) over its monetary easing policy. Additionally, the IMF reckons that the Singapore economy could grow 1.8% this year and around 2.5% in 2017.

The Philippines stock market has given the country’s new president a vote of approval. Rodrigo Duterte, who secured around 39% of the votes, is hoping to heal the wounds of a bitter election campaign by holding out an olive branch to his opponents. Could be just the tonic for Del Monte Pacific (SGX: D03).

Japan has warned speculators that it would intervene in the foreign exchange market, if the strong yen hurts the country’s trade and economy. Koichi Hamada, a key advisor to Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, said Japan would step in if the yen rose to between 90 and 95 against the US dollar.

And finally, 19 Singapore and 13 Hong Kong terms have made it into the Oxford English dictionary. The Singapore words include “wah”, “sabo” and “shiok”, while the Hong Kong words include “yum cha”, “char siu” and “dai pai dong”.

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