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3 Things You Need To Know About the Singapore Stock Market Today

Welcome to Monday evening! Here are three things about Singapore’s stock market and investing in general that you might want to look at today and over the rest of the week.

1. Local iPhone and iPad retailer Epicentre Holdings Limited (SGX: 5MQ) had turned to crowdfunding platforms recently to borrow money. While the company had made the headlines as it is the first listed company in Singapore’s stock market to do so, what’s really intriguing is how pricey Epicentre’s crowdfunded debt-deal was. To the latter point, the company’s paying an annual interest rate of 13.5% for loans with a tenure of only one year. My colleague Wilson Ong had explored Epicentre’s unusual financing move in greater detail, so you can check out his thoughts right here.

2. Dean Williams in an investor that not many people – even those within the investing community – know of. But, he’s also an investor who has given one of the best investing speeches I’ve ever come across. The speech in question was delivered in 1981 and is titled “Trying Too hard.” Last week, I had shared some of my favourite parts of Williams’ speech along with my takeaways. Jump in here for more!

3. United Overseas Bank Ltd’s (SGX: U11) chief executive, Wee Ee Cheong, had recently shared some brilliant insights on the current business and economic landscape – involving China, an economic slowdown, and the price of oil – by drawing on lessons he has picked up from the past. Chin Hui Leong, another of my fellow Fools, had written a piece on this, so you can dig in right here.

Meanwhile, to learn more about investing and to keep up to date on the latest financial and stock market news, you can sign up for a FREE subscription to The Motley Fool's weekly investing newsletter, Take Stock Singapore. Also, like us on Facebook to follow our latest hot articles.

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The information provided is for general information purposes only and is not intended to be personalised investment or financial advice. Motley Fool Singapore writer Chong Ser Jing doesn't own shares in any companies mentioned.